Lee Renninger Ceramics Workshop & Demonstration and Gallery Talk

                     

On Wednesday, January 31, we were honored by the return of Lee Renninger to lead a ceramics workshop and demonstration, and later on in the day, revisit her ceramic installations in the Gallery of Art + Design to give a gallery talk and speak about each of the works individually. 

The event started in the morning with Renninger speaking on her artistic development and how her style of creation tended to be process based. She was enthusiastic in answering all questions, and encouraged the students present to strive to be open-minded and authentic with their work and ideas. Renninger gave insight to how she always pushed for success in getting exposure for her work, but accepted that she has to work other jobs for income. 

She also introduced a sneak-peak into her work in progress, revolving around the phrase “let them eat cake,” which Renninger feels that the public has been told by the government in relation to recent policies, and pulled out tiny, delicate, multicolored porcelain leaves, some of which she was already experimenting with how she would tie them together. This new body of art seems to be at its start, but is certainly something to keep an eye on in the future! The remaining time of the workshop, Renninger spent time individually with current students and those who had brought ceramic work in to discuss processes and troubleshooting.

Thank you to all who came and participated in the workshop, and a huge thanks to Lee Renninger for spending time in the studio with us and her wonderful advice! Follow SMAD on social media (@usmartdesign) for future updates and announcements for future events like these!





BOTANICA by Lee Renninger Opening Night



On Wednesday, January 24th, the USM Gallery of Art + Design opened its inaugural event of the year with a solo exhibition of Lee Renninger’s Botanica. Professor Stacy Reischman Fletcher opened the showing and introduced Lee Renninger. The Ben and Nan Stevens Fund was recognized and their representatives were 
awarded with framed prints of the event’s poster for their generous donation that made the Botanica gallery showing possible. The exhibition opening was well attended and showcased free-flowing installation art made up of complex sculptural ceramics. Thank you for all who came out and attended Lee Renninger’s gallery showing! Botanica will remain in the Gallery until February 16th.

2017 National Juried Painting Exhibition Awards’ Night




On Friday, September 22nd, the Gallery of Art + Design hosted their awards ceremony for the National Juried Painting Exhibition. The night began with a lecture by Peter van Dyke, who was also the juror of the show. During his Lecture Peter van Dyke showed slides of his painting process, which was enlightening to the students and community alike. The reception was lovely with many people who came out to look at and celebrate some of the best painted work in the nation! Thank you to everyone that came out!

The award winners were:
3rd place: Neil Callander for Early Spring Window
2nd place: Michael Nichols for the group: Slur, Blear and Brume
1st place: Allan Anderson for Red Roof in New Brookland
 

Hub City Invitational

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On January 26 the USM Gallery of Art and Design hosted the opening reception to the Hub City Invitational Exhibition which showcased work by some of the finest artist in the area. The strong showing of work highlighted the strength of the local art community and helped to introduce SMAD students to the fellow artist working around them. The exhibition will be on display until February 17th. 

Proximity by Tirzah Legg – November 29-December 16

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The work of Tirzah Legg, senior art student at USM, is on display in the Gallery of Art and Design in the George Hurst building. The show is titled Proximity, and will be open until December 16.

The works presented in the show carry the overarching theme of the natural. When you first walk into the gallery, the first thing that catches the eye are several white net-like structures, rising around orange clay pots full of what appears to be water. According Legg’s artist statement, these structures are inspired by fungi.

The pots were made from clay that Tirzah harvested from three specific locales. The first is from her hometown in Saucier. The second was from Perkinston, where Legg attended community college, and the third is from around Hattiesburg, where Legg will be graduating from USM.

Legg states that the logs refer to the mythological phoenix, in which a bird is born from its own ashes. “So too,” states Legg, “are the logs that were burned to create these ceramic forms.” These plaster-cast logs stand upright on end, a marbled covering giving them a stony look over their organic, wooden forms.

The third type of object represented are the beetles, which Legg was drawn to because of their diversity. The beetles are colorful and shiny, displaying a variety of texture. Legg says that she used “the formal study of the form, color, and texture of beetles” to represent a “transition from functional pottery to sculptural ceramics.”